PCP Lawyer 

The U.S. federal government considers PCP to be a Schedule II drug as defined by the Controlled Substances Act. Schedule II drugs are believed to have a high potential for abuse. They can be used legally only in strictly controlled medical settings.

Penalties for someone who is found with PCP are harsh. This person may be charged with from five to 40 years in prison and fines of up to $4 million for a first PCP offense. Repeat offenders may be sentenced to prison for 20 years to life and fined up to eight million dollars.

If you have been charged with using, making or selling PCP, you need an experienced attorney who has had many years defending clients against drug offenses. David M. Dudley, a state and federal defense lawyer, has decades of experience defending against a number of federal drug charges. He has a proven record of success defending against major drug prosecutions involving excessive amounts of PCP, LSD, heroin, ecstasy, marijuana and methamphetamine.

PCP (phencyclidine)

PCP (phencyclidine) is a manufactured drug that was developed in the 1950s as an intravenous anesthetic. However, it was never approved for use because it failed in patient trials. One of its problems was found to be intensely negative psychological side effects during clinical studies. Today the drug is no longer used or made for legitimate purposes (except in strictly controlled medical settings).

Street names for the drug are angel dust, ozone, wack, rocket fuel, supergrass, killer weed, embalming fluid, boat, hog, love boat, peace pill and sherms.

In its pure form, PCP looks like a white crystalline powder. It has a bitter taste and dissolves easily in water. Most of the time, the drug is contaminated and looks tan or brown. In consistency, it can vary from a powder to a gummy mass.

PCP is classified by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) as an hallucinogen and by researchers as a dissociative drug. Reactions to PCP include:

  • Slurred speech
  • Loss of coordination
  • Rapid, involuntary eye movements
  • Hearing hallucinations, image distortion, severe mood disorders, amnesia
  • Altered perceptions of time and distance
  • Acute anxiety
  • Feelings of impending doom
  • Paranoia
  • Violent hostility
  • Schizophrenia-like behavior and feelings

"PCP use is associated with a number of risks and many believe it to be one of the most dangerous drugs of abuse," according to the Drug Enforcement Administration.

The penalties for federal drug charges involving PCP are severe. For the best chances of getting your charges reduced or dismissed, contact Mr. Dudley today.